How to display the week number in a SharePoint calendar

I would like to display the week number in a calendar month view. I searched on Bing and google for a while, but all I could find was how to display the week number in a date picker.

Here is a screenshot of what I would like to have (or something similar) :

Update1

After Marc D Anderson commented with how to figure out where to place and calculate the week. This is the screenshot what happens to your date picker after you enabled the “Show week numbers in the Data Navigator” in your sites Regional Settings. So the answer to these questions is somewhere in this screenshot J

Why I joined BIWUG as an active member last year.

Last year (2010) I joined BIWUG as an ”active member”. BIWUG is the Belgian Luxemburg Information Worker User Group. A lot of people (including myself) had some criticism  on BIWUG. Mainly on their on-line presence, the website (which is a WSS 2.0 website at the moment of writing) but also on the topics and subject that were presented during the BIWUG sessions.

The reason I started talking with the current board members was because I was a little disappointed in the content of the sessions. Just like Microsoft, BIWUG is focused on developer and IT PRO’s. and actually even a little more on developers. The actual members are also mainly developers and IT-PRO’s. And they also work for consulting or outsourcing companies, so this makes it a select group of IT professionals. While SharePoint is so much more then developing and administrating. See also my blog post Why Microsoft is wrong in their SharePoint bring to market approach.

So instead of just complaining, I joined BIWUG together with Peter Cattersel and our mission is to start a third track next to SharePoint development and Administrating tracks. We currently name it Information Worker track, but it might be renamed to Knowledge Worker track or Functional track. We are also going to try to broaden the members of the user group. We would like to have more functional consultants joining BIWUG and also business (super)users.

What is going to change? Peter and I created a list of topics that we think should be presented during on of the BIWUG sessions, and most probably we will deliver some sessions ourselves. We will also try to find channels to reach to the SharePoint customer base in Belgium, and I’m silently hoping Microsoft is willing to help us with this. I know they have a GREAT marketing department in Belgium and I think we might collaborate very well without exchanging customer names and contact details :-). There are also some structural things I would like to change in the BIWUG organization, but I can’t disclose that in a blog post.

In a meanwhile, since this is the first time for me that I engage myself to a user group, it will require some personal organization and if other user groups would like to share experiences, best and worst practices, PLEASE DO SO. You can comment in this blog, direct message me on Twitter or if 140 characters is not enough, you can email me directly at .

Overview of available SharePoint books

Since it is almost Christmas I decided to create a reading list to inspire people, and to have a quick overview of available reading material on SharePoint 2010 and related product. So if you’re partner is into SharePoint, you might find a last minute Christmas present in this list. This is also a list that represents what I would like to read.

I have organized the books in 3 levels. The fist one are books for non-developers and non IT-PRO. They are high level SharePoint, organizational or quit generic. The second one are books for IT-PRO’s, and the third one are books for (power)users of SharePoint but also related software like Office 2010 and Infopath. I don’t have a chapter dedicated to development books, since I don’t know really much about development, hence I can’t add these kinds of books to my ‘wish list’.

SharePoint books for non-developers or IT-PRO’s

 

SharePoint books for IT-PRO’s

 

SharePoint 2010 and related products for the (power)user

Since it is almost Christmas I decided to create a reading list to inspire people, and to have a quick overview of available reading material on SharePoint 2010 and related product. So if you’re partner is into SharePoint, you might find a last minute Christmas present in this list.

I have organized the books in 3 levels. The fist one are books for non-developers and non IT-PRO. They are high level SharePoint, organizational or quit generic. The second one are books for IT-PRO’s, and the third one are books for (power)users of SharePoint but also related software like Office 2010 and Infopath. I don’t have a chapter dedicated to development books, since I don’t know really much about development, hence I can’t add these kinds of books to my ‘wish list’.

SharePoint books for non-developers or IT-PRO’s

 

SharePoint books for IT-PRO’s

 

SharePoint 2010 and related products for the (power)user

Yahoo doesn’t like delicious, I did, but am looking for alternatives.

For people who are not familiar with delicious, it is a social bookmarking service that allows users to tag, manage, save and share web pages. The links are stores in the cloud (on the delicious infrastructure) and are accessible from within most browsers.

Delicious Logo On Thursday 16/12/2010 a slide from an internal presentation at Yahoo leaked out on twitter. The slide was posted by Eric Marcoulier, co-founder of MyBlogLog, another service that is listed in the Sunset column.

From that Thursday a lot of initiatives were started to save delicious, because word was out that Yahoo would close it down. A Facebook group was created, the twitter hashtag #savedelicious was born and numerous online petitions were setup and signed by thousands of people.  (Twitition by 853 and act.ly by 4174 at this moment).

Then Friday Yahoo replied official on the delicious blog.

– No, we are not shutting down Delicious. While we have determined that there is not a strategic fit at Yahoo!, we believe there is a ideal home for Delicious outside of the company where it can be resourced to the level where it can be competitive.

Actually what Yahoo explains here, is that they bought delicious some time ago, didn’t pay appropriate attention to it (not a lot new features were added) and they would like to get rid of it.

So, delicious will continue to live for a while, but I am looking for alternative and will post about my alternative and why I choose it.

For people not familiar with delicious, it is a social bookmarking service that allows users to tag, manage, save and share web pages. The links are stores in the cloud (on the delicious infrastructure) and are accessible from within most browsers.

  On Thursday 16/12/2010 a slide from an internal presentation at Yahoo leaked out on twitter. The slide was posted by Eric Marcoulier, co-founder of MyBlogLog, another service that is listed in the Sunset column.

 

 

From that Thursday a lot of initiatives were started to save delicious, because word was out that Yahoo would close it down. A Facebook group was created, the twitter hashtag #savedelicious was born and numerous online petitions were setup and signed by thousands of people.  (Twitition by 853 and act.ly by 4174 at this moment).

Then Friday Yahoo replied official on the delicious blog.

– No, we are not shutting down Delicious. While we have determined that there is not a strategic fit at Yahoo!, we believe there is a ideal home for Delicious outside of the company where it can be resourced to the level where it can be competitive.

Actually what Yahoo explains here, is that they bought delicious some time ago, didn’t pay appropriate attention to it (not a lot new features were added) and they would like to get rid of it.

So, delicious will continue to live for a while, but I am looking for alternative and will post about my alternative and why I choose it.

Microsoft Tech-Ed Europe 2010 presentations are available online

Some of you readers were fortunate to attend Tech-Ed Europe last week in Berlin (8-12th November 2010), others, like me, did not had the opportunity to attend. I consider Tech-Ed as a broad-based conference, while I (try) to focus on SharePoint only. So you’ll rather find me attending a SharePoint only conference like the European Best Practices SharePoint Conference, which is hosted by Combined Knowledge in London from April 11th-13th 2011. I’m also really interested in attending SharePoint Conference 2011 hosted by Microsoft on Anaheim, CA on October 3rd-6th 2011.

Anyway, for everybody who didn’t attend Tech-Ed Europe, or who would like to see sessions (s)he didn’t follow, there a lot of presentations and sessions available online at the Tech-Ed website.

SharePoint and Office specific presentations can be found via this link : http://www.msteched.com/2010/Europe/Tracks/OfficeSharePoint

Or an overview of all sessions : http://www.msteched.com/2010/Europe/Browse

Have fun watching these presentations and I hope you learn some things :-)

Mails got delivered 3 times in SharePoint enabled discussion board when using an automatic rule in Lotus Notes 7.0.3Mails got delivered 3 times when using an automatic rule in Lotus Notes 7.0.3

Today we encountered a strange issue sending emails to SharePoint. This is the configuration:

  1. A Incoming Email enabled discussion board (disboard@collab.company.com)

    alt

  2. A Lotus Notes mailbox (mailbox@company.com) Email Client with a rule to forward ALL documents to the Discussion board, hence auto-forward everything to disboard@collab.company.com
     

When we send an email from Lotus Notes directly to the discussion board, it worked perfect. The mail is delivered once and displayed like it should be.
When we use the forwarding rule in Lotus Notes, the (forwarded) email is delivered 3 times as you can also see in the screenshot.alt

At this point I was puzzled and started troubleshooting. To test the pure email forwarding functionality, I created a extra forwarder for all documents to my @hotmail.com email address. This worked fine, the (forwarded) email was delivered once into my hotmail inbox. But on the SharePoint site, these mails were delivered 3 times. I noticed when I opened the "triple entries" that the subject had another identifier.

alt

One of the other 2 subjects displayed nothing extra, and the second had 1736 attached to its "subject".

Of course I was thinking about issues with this forwarding mechanism, and more specific the communication between the SMTP servers,(hence the Domino server and the SMTP connecter of the IIS servers) so I decided to do extra test so I can exclude (or point out) SharePoint as the cause of this issue.
I created a email enabled Document library. When I initiated tests to this Email enabled document library, the test results were all as they should be, even when using the auto –forward rule from Lotus Notes to this Email enable Document library. The email was delivered to the SharePoint Document Library once.

So my first thought of this being a problem with the Domino server got redirected to SharePoint, more specific the settings of my Email enabled discussion board. I compared t
As I noticed when sending a mail directly to the Email Enabled Discussion Board, the original email was saved as an attachment. The emails that appeared 3 times, did not had any attachments, except the original email who got attached to the item….

So, after changing the Save original email setting to NO, it worked just fine.

I tried to create a schema of this, so It would be a little more easy to understand:

alt

SharePoint Connections PreConference day

For the first time I have registered for a pre conference day. Actually I registered for the pre and post conference session.

The pre-conference workshop was delivered by Dan Holme ( and the topic was : “SharePoint Collaboration Masterclass”. It was an interesting session with a few new items for me but it definitely triggered some ideas.

Dan talked about the “administrator jumpstart”. Basically he explained which accounts you better create (actually you’ll need them) before you start installing and configuring SharePoint 2010. Also it is a best practice to use Powershell scripts to install and configure your farm(s). Especially when you have an Acceptance, Pre-Production and Production environment, by scripting the installation and configuration, you can be sure that they are installed and configured the same way. Another interesting point he mentioned, was that the Cumulative Updates are handled differently in SharePoint 2010 then in SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS 2007). Now, when you have SharePoint server 2010 installed, you don’t need to install the CU OF SharePoint Foundation prior to the installation of the CU for SharePoint Server. So you can install the SharePoint Server CU directly. This will save some time and reboots.
Also, when you don’t configure the outgoing email settings, all the features that use this (like alerts) will not be activated on you sites.

After the first break, the subject was Creating the Collaboration Application. Interesting to hear was this advice. Don’t use (or configure) Claims Based authentication, unless you are really sure you will need/use it.
Dan also mentioned that it is a best practice to use A record in your DNS server setting and not C Names.
When creating your top level Site Collection, the Publishing Site might be a very good choice if you would like to brand your sites. (via the masterpages). The publishing site has more masterpages ‘installed’ and this would make it easier to apply some custom branding on these sites.  Oh yes, of course when you used the Publishing Site template, you will not be able to create a subsite other then another Publishing site,unless you activate these Site templates in the Look and Feel section / Page Layouts and Templates. You can access these pages via the Site Settings.
Today, there were no sacrifices done to the Demo Gods, so some of his demos didn’t work well. Like the one where Dan would show how you can adopt users by creating shortcuts in the Network Locations. But he explained it pretty good.

After Lunch Security was the topic. Claims based authentication can store extra attributes  or properties, so you can use these properties to target content . (For instance country)
Dan also told you don’t need to extend WebApplications anymore when you want to use multiple authentication providers.
Another best practice explained. To allow a user (even a visitor) to see a certain site in his or hers Mysite, you can create a new “default” group. You give this group very restricted permissions on the site, and you add ALL the site users to this group (besides the other groups like members or visitor). By doing this, these users will see the site appear in their MySite. Oh yes, small remark, this will only work with individual user rights, not when adding an Active Directory group.

Dan also gave a demonstration of the Office integration and SharePoint, but again, the demo gods weren’t our friends.

After the break, Dan talked, while you could really see him fighting his jetlag, about the Remote BLOB Storage . What I remember and noted was that the default RBS (Filestream provider) can only use local drives, and that you can also use AvePoint DocAve extender for this. A good advice was that when you use SQL backup, you should also backup your BLOB location manually. This is not needed when you use the backup procedures in Central Admin, and I presume third party tools will also tackle this.

The last topic was Managed Metadata and the Taxonomy living together with the Folksonomy. Dan also showed the metadata based views and filters.

We had a really nice chat after the session, with some additional Q&A, and then I went out to diner with Marcel Franke. Because diner took more time then I thought, I wasn’t able to attend the DIWUG session.
Arriving back at my hotel I saw Karine Bosh (MVP and also known for some of us as ‘The CAML girl’) and I sacrificed myself to go out for diner with her, although I just drank a few Grimbergen beers, but we had a really nice conversation about SharePoint, U2, Phil Collins and job satisfaction.

Nintex Workflow for SharePoint 2010 released

I guess it was not an accident that Nintex released Nintex Workflow 2010 on day 1 of #WPC, the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference.

When I was searching for some Nintex video’s on Youtube, I found this very nice video of Mike Fitzmaurice explaining with his well known and recognizable voice what Nintex Workflow 2010 is.

For the readers who are not familiar with Nintex workflow, it adds a drag-and-drop workflow designer, connectivity and advanced workflow features to the Microsoft SharePoint document management and collaboration platform, empowering business users and IT Professionals alike to quickly and easily automate business processes; from a simple leave approval request, to complex integration across external applications and data sources.

The slogan of Nintex is “Worklfow for everyone™” and if you ask me, that’s what they bring

I would like to add or emphasize a really important reason why Nintex Workflow is IMO “better” then a custom development workflow. Release management. When a Visual Studio workflow is ready for production and a WSP (SharePoint Solution) file is produced, you have to go to he release management procedures and processes, and they can be quite hard with SharePoint.

The moment my SharePoint 2010 environment is up and running , I will start to experiment with Nintex Workflow 2010, and if time allows me, I’ll even post about that :-)

I guess it was not an accident that Nintex released Nintex Workflow 2010 on day 1 of #WPC, the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference.

When I was searching for some Nintex video’s on Youtube, I found this very nice video of Mike Fitzmaurice explaining with his well known and recognizable voice what Nintex Workflow 2010 is.

For the readers who are not familiar with Nintex workflow, it adds a drag-and-drop workflow designer, connectivity and advanced workflow features to the Microsoft SharePoint document management and collaboration platform, empowering business users and IT Professionals alike to quickly and easily automate business processes; from a simple leave approval request, to complex integration across external applications and data sources.

The slogan of Nintex is “Worklfow for everyone™” and if you ask me, that’s what they bring

 

I would like to add or emphasize a really important reason why Nintex Workflow is IMO “better” then a custom development workflow. Release management. When a Visual Studio workflow is ready for production and a WSP (SharePoint Solution) file is produced, you have to go to he release management procedures and processes, and they can be quite hard with SharePoint.

The moment my SharePoint 2010 environment is up and running , I will start to experiment with Nintex Workflow 2010, and if time allows me, I’ll even post about that :-)

Why Microsoft is wrong in their SharePoint bring to market approach.

Since a few years I execute the job of SharePoint consultant. SharePoint seems to be one of the most successful product, maybe even the most successful product Microsoft has launched. Then why should a guy like me complain about that Microsoft is wrong in their bring to market? They probably earn billion$ with SharePoint. And they should, because it is a great product! But at the end of this post, in the quote you can see my worry.

During the SharePoint Evolution conference SPEVO held in April of this year, my memory was refreshed of something that was said during one of the analyst sessions in the SharePoint Conference 2009 (SPC09) in Las Vegas.
The SPEVO was actually the SharePoint Best Practices Europe Conference, but because of the launch of a new version called SharePoint 2010 there were not a lot best practices to share on SharePoint 2010. BUT the organizers of this conference really got the message I’ll talk about in this blog post. They organized a IW (Information Worker stream) In fact, they organized even 2 parallel streams. Well done Steve Smith!

During a session from Symon Garfield, he explained why 70% of all projects fail. There are several reason, like unclear requirements, scope changes. One of the main failure reasons is that a SharePoint project can’t be driven only by IT.
SharePoint is a business driven product. IT can install, deploy and support it, but it can not solely drive it toward long term success.
You also need to have a good user adoption plan, and some corporate guidelines (let’s call them governance) to make sure that when people really start using SharePoint, it doesn’t get a maze where you can’t do or find anything. If you take a look at the Microsoft Press books, about 99% of the SharePoint books are technically focused. There is a lack of business side books. (Thank you Michael Samspon for representing this 1%)

During that analyst panel session at SPC09 there was a discussion about having a third pillar next to the Developers and IT PRO’s. The name was not specified, but lets call this group Functional people, or Functionals.  For me, but also for all SharePoint projects in general, I thought that was good, no even great news.

But until now, nothing has changed. From Microsoft’s opinion you are or a developer, or an IT PRO.There is no new group. Or you write code, or you have access to Central Admin.

A good example of this are Ignite Sessions. They are organized for IT Professionals and Developers, but not for Functionals. Even with such a huge release of  SharePoint 2010, where a lot extra power is provided to PowerUsers, and it very important to have that link between Business and IT.

Or the Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Developer and IT Professional Learning Plan.

In my first conversation with Karine Bosch (a Belgian SharePoint MVP) right after a BIWUG session  we were talking about what we did in the SharePoint world. When she explained what she does I replied, “Oh, you’re a code sh|tter”, without being disrespectful. That’s good because we need SharePoint code writers I replied, (you can also read developers)  to cover non ‘Out Of The Box’ functionality , When I explained what I do, I summarized it with “I’m a document sh|tter”. And We also need them (I guess). Actually that’s also what Karine confirmed.

That’s why in my humble opinion that Microsoft is acting wrongly. Until now, they don’t provide any special documentation or support for these Functionals. Besides some sales and marketing information on how SharePoint will make your organization more productive, there is no specific information for the Functionals. They are just twilights. They act the “Build it and they will come” way.
And they should pay attention to this, because otherwise SharePoint might become one of these “Oooh darn, it’s a SharePoint” applications.

That’s also why I am so happy that guys like Michael Samspon, the author of Seamless Teamwork, a book on using SharePoint from a business perspective, Raymond Dux Sy , the author of SharePoint for Project Management: How to Create a Project Management Information System (PMIS) and Paul Culmsee take a different approach on SharePoint. I will do my best to provide useful information like these guys do in their blogs, webcasts, books, … That will be my way to contribute to the grey twilight zone that Microsoft can’t fill.

On the other hand, I must admit that I know a few, but just a few guys that are good at coding, have a good knowledge of the the Out Of The Box functionality of SharePoint and are able to talk to the business and translate their requirements to SharePoint functionality. These are the golden egg chickens…

But to conclude, what I’m trying to explain is that Microsoft, and the Microsoft partners will be judged by their clients (the business) based on the return SharePoint gives to the business, not on it’s nice technical gracefulness.

Just for the record, here are my my questions to Microsoft.

What are your intentions to this issue? (When)Are you planning to setup a functional stream?

Since a few years I execute the job of SharePoint consultant. SharePoint seems to be one of the most successful product, maybe even the most successful product Microsoft has launched. Then why should a guy like me complain about that Microsoft is wrong in their bring to market? They probably earn billion$ with SharePoint. And they should, because it is a great product! But at the end of this post, in the quote you can see my worry.

During the SharePoint Evolution conference SPEVO held in April of this year, my memory was refreshed of something that was said during one of the analyst sessions in the SharePoint Conference 2009 (SPC09) in Las Vegas.
The SPEVO was actually the SharePoint Best Practices Europe Conference, but because of the launch of a new version called SharePoint 2010 there were not a lot best practices to share on SharePoint 2010. BUT the organizers of this conference really got the message I’ll talk about in this blog post. They organized a IW (Information Worker stream) In fact, they organized even 2 parallel streams. Well done Steve Smith!

During a session from Symon Garfield, he explained why 70% of all projects fail. There are several reason, like unclear requirements, scope changes. If you take £SharePoint,  one of the main reasons is that a SharePoint project can’t be driven only by IT. SharePoint is a business driven product. IT can install, deploy and support it, but it can not solely drive it toward long term success.
You also need to have a good user adoption plan, and some corporate guidelines (let’s call them governance) to make sure that when people really start using SharePoint, it doesn’t get a maze where you can’t do or find anything. If you take a look at the Microsoft Press books, about 99% of the SharePoint books are technically focused. There is a lack of business side books. (Thank you Michael Samspon for representing this 1%)

During that analyst panel session at SPC09 there was a discussion about having a third pillar next to the Developers  and IT PRO’s. The name was not specified, but lets call this group Functional people, or Functionals.  For me, but also for all SharePoint projects in general, I thought that was good, no even great news.

But until now, nothing has changed. From Microsoft’s opinion you are or a developer, or an IT PRO.There is no new group. Or you write code, or you have access to Central Admin.

Take for example the Ignite Sessions. They are organized for IT Professionals and Developers, but not for Functionals. Even with such a huge release of  SharePoint 2010, where a lot extra power is provided to PowerUsers, and it very important to have that link between Business and IT.

Or the Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Developer and IT Professional Learning Plan.

In my first conversation with Karine Bosch (a Belgian SharePoint MVP) right after a BIWUG session  we were talking about what we did in the SharePoint world. When she explained what she does I replied, “Oh, you’re a code sh|tter”, without being disrespectful. That’s good because we need SharePoint code writers (you can also read developers)  to cover non ‘Out Of The Box’ functionality , When I explained what I do, I summarized it with “I’m a document sh|tter”. And We also need them (I guess). Actually that’s also what Karine confirmed.

That’s why (I would say) in my humble opinion that Microsoft is acting wrong. Until now, they don’t provide any special documentation or support for these Functionals.  Besides some sales and marketing information on how SharePoint will make your organization more productive, there is no specific information for the Functionals. They are just twilights.
And they should pay attention to this, because otherwise SharePoint might become one of these “Oooh darn, it’s a SharePoint” applications.

That’s also why I am so happy that guys like Michael Samspon, the author of Seamless Teamwork, a book on using SharePoint from a business perspective, Raymond Dux Sy , the author of SharePoint for Project Management: How to Create a Project Management Information System (PMIS) and Paul Culmsee take a different approach on SharePoint. I will do my best to provide useful information like these guys do in their blogs, webcasts, … That will be my way to contribute to the grey twilight zone that Microsoft can’t fill.

On the other hand, I must admit that I know a few, but just a few guys that are good at coding, have a good knowledge of the the Out Of The Box functionality of SharePoint and are able to talk to the business and translate their requirements to SharePoint functionality. These are the golden egg chickens…

But to conclude, what I’m also trying to explain is that Microsoft, and the Microsoft partners will be judged by their clients (the business) based on the return SharePoint gives to the business, not on it’s nice technical gracefulness.

 

Just for the record, here are my my questions to Microsoft.

What are your intentions to this issue? (When)Are you planning to setup a functional stream?

SharePoint Governance survey on site Closure by @Collabguy.

A fellow consultant and blogger Michael Sampson @collabguy organized a survey on Site Closure.

Michael is the author of the book  Seamless Teamwork: Using Microsoft SharePoint Technologies to Collaborate, Innovate, and Drive Business in New Ways, which I recently received from Combined Knowledge (many many thanks for that Zoé and Steve). I would recommend this book for everybody who is interested in empowering people and team with SharePoint.

But I don’t post this just to talk about this book. The reason I write this post is because Michael has launched a survey on Site Closure. And The survey will close on friday July 9th. So this is yet another last minute post…

His next book, SharePoint Roadmap Governance Themes, greatly expands on the governance chapter in SharePoint Roadmap for Collaboration. Two themes have been explored to date — Site Creation Rights, and User Adoption Strategies — and there are reports available on both of those. The third theme for investigation is Site Closure Policy. In other words, what do you do with SharePoint sites when their useful life is at an end, however you define that?

As with the previous two reports, there’s a survey. If you have involvement in setting governance decisions for SharePoint at your organization, please take the survey now.

Respondents who complete the survey will receive a free copy of the research report, due for publication in July 2010.

The survey closes on Friday July 9 … so please do it now!! Thanks.

A fellow consultant and blogger Michael Sampson @collabguy organized a survey on Site Closure.

Michael is the author of the book  Seamless Teamwork: Using Microsoft SharePoint Technologies to Collaborate, Innovate, and Drive Business in New Ways, which I recently received from Combined Knowledge (many many thanks for that Zoé and Steve). I would recommend this book for everybody who is interested in empowering people and team with SharePoint.

But I don’t post this just to talk about this book. The reason I write this post is because Michael has launched a survey on Site Closure. And The survey will close on friday July 9th. So this is yet another last minute post…

His next book, SharePoint Roadmap Governance Themes, greatly expands on the governance chapter in SharePoint Roadmap for Collaboration. Two themes have been explored to date — Site Creation Rights, and User Adoption Strategies — and there are reports available on both of those. The third theme for investigation is Site Closure Policy. In other words, what do you do with SharePoint sites when their useful life is at an end, however you define that?

As with the previous two reports, there’s a survey. If you have involvement in setting governance decisions for SharePoint at your organization, please take the survey now.

Respondents who complete the survey will receive a free copy of the research report, due for publication in July 2010.

The survey closes on Friday July 9 … so please do it now!! Thanks.